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Columbus, OH, 43205
USA

"I wish it were fin du globe," said Dorian with a sigh. "Life is a great disappointment."

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A Saturday Juxtaposition : His & Her Favorite Childhood Book.

Angie P

Childhood books are things you remember your entire life. They're obsessed over, read multiple times, and ultimately can shape our future selves. 

Her : Scary Stories To Tell In The Dark by Alvin Schwartz and illustrated by Stephen Gammell. There were three books total and this is actually the treasury of all three. I found this book later on in life at a thrift store--It was $1.50, seriously. I still own my original copies but this book is in perfect condition. The best part of elementary school was the Scholastic Book Fair and getting so excited for the way it transformed our school library into a bookstore. My mom would give me some money that morning and I got to shop, on my own, for whatever book I wanted. I remember vividly taking the bus home with my new purchase and being so excited to read.  As a young artist I tried so hard to imitate the illustrations. To this day I still think they're fantastic works of art. The stories themselves were very short, yet quite scary to a young kid. Alvin Schwartz definitely shaped who I am today because I still devour horror novels like nobody's business. 

Her : Scary Stories To Tell In The Dark by Alvin Schwartz and illustrated by Stephen Gammell. There were three books total and this is actually the treasury of all three. I found this book later on in life at a thrift store--It was $1.50, seriously. I still own my original copies but this book is in perfect condition. The best part of elementary school was the Scholastic Book Fair and getting so excited for the way it transformed our school library into a bookstore. My mom would give me some money that morning and I got to shop, on my own, for whatever book I wanted. I remember vividly taking the bus home with my new purchase and being so excited to read.  As a young artist I tried so hard to imitate the illustrations. To this day I still think they're fantastic works of art. The stories themselves were very short, yet quite scary to a young kid. Alvin Schwartz definitely shaped who I am today because I still devour horror novels like nobody's business. 

His : Harold and the Purple Crayon by Crockett Johnson. This is Ryan's original copy. In Ryan's own words, "Around age 5 or so, I was the child of a single parent and my mom struggled to make ends meet. Food stamps and the kindness of others got us through some very tense situations. Harold and the Purple Crayon was one of the first books I remember loving and obsessing over. Since we didn't own a car, we relied on long walks and even longer bus trips to get around town. I have so many vivid memories of wishing I had Harold's crayon so that I could draw us into better circumstances. Sitting at a crosswalk, I remember tracing my finger around the shapes of buildings and parked cars so that when the time came, I'd be able to draw my own world. But in the most cruelest of fates, I would later come to realize that I did not possess a single ounce of drawing ability. Had I found Harold's crayon, the world would be a much uglier place. Transportation would become physically impossible, buildings would crumble, nature would die out. Deformed creatures would roam hilly and jagged terrain while a constant sun would peek out of a single cloud heating the planet to an inhospitable temperature. But still, the small message in Harold is to hold onto your dreams, push away the cynicism and do your part in making the world you want to live in. And god dammit, take a drawing class at an early age."

His : Harold and the Purple Crayon by Crockett Johnson. This is Ryan's original copy. In Ryan's own words, "Around age 5 or so, I was the child of a single parent and my mom struggled to make ends meet. Food stamps and the kindness of others got us through some very tense situations. Harold and the Purple Crayon was one of the first books I remember loving and obsessing over. Since we didn't own a car, we relied on long walks and even longer bus trips to get around town. I have so many vivid memories of wishing I had Harold's crayon so that I could draw us into better circumstances. Sitting at a crosswalk, I remember tracing my finger around the shapes of buildings and parked cars so that when the time came, I'd be able to draw my own world. But in the most cruelest of fates, I would later come to realize that I did not possess a single ounce of drawing ability. Had I found Harold's crayon, the world would be a much uglier place. Transportation would become physically impossible, buildings would crumble, nature would die out. Deformed creatures would roam hilly and jagged terrain while a constant sun would peek out of a single cloud heating the planet to an inhospitable temperature. But still, the small message in Harold is to hold onto your dreams, push away the cynicism and do your part in making the world you want to live in. And god dammit, take a drawing class at an early age."